marxvx:

liberal social justice is saying “don’t discriminate against poor people” instead of “why are people poor in the fucking first place”

(via ambelle)

the1975obsessed:

kawaii-animals-only:

One corgi, two corgi, three corgi, four corgi…

Save these pictures before you lose it on your dash
the1975obsessed:

kawaii-animals-only:

One corgi, two corgi, three corgi, four corgi…

Save these pictures before you lose it on your dash
the1975obsessed:

kawaii-animals-only:

One corgi, two corgi, three corgi, four corgi…

Save these pictures before you lose it on your dash
the1975obsessed:

kawaii-animals-only:

One corgi, two corgi, three corgi, four corgi…

Save these pictures before you lose it on your dash
the1975obsessed:

kawaii-animals-only:

One corgi, two corgi, three corgi, four corgi…

Save these pictures before you lose it on your dash
the1975obsessed:

kawaii-animals-only:

One corgi, two corgi, three corgi, four corgi…

Save these pictures before you lose it on your dash

the1975obsessed:

kawaii-animals-only:

One corgi, two corgi, three corgi, four corgi…

Save these pictures before you lose it on your dash

(via hummusrevolutionaryfront)

dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.
dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.
Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.
Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.
With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.
As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.

dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.

Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.

Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.

With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.

As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.

(via black-culture)

blackhistoryalbum:

Ms. Poppins | The Black Victorians | 1890s

(via freshmouthgoddess)

fuckyeahsanaalathan:

nowwatchthatblackboyfly:

Sanaa.

all time fave

Love. Love love.

50starsand13bars:

hokutens-and-assassins:

PLEASE READ AND REBLOG!!!!!


Put your car keys beside your bed at night.

Tell your spouse, your children, your neighbors, your parents, your Dr’s office, the check-out girl at the market, everyone you run across. Put your car keys beside your bed at night.

If you hear a noise outside your home or someone trying to get in your house, just press the panic button for your car. The alarm will be set off, and the horn will continue to sound until either you turn it off or the car battery dies.

This tip came from a neighborhood watch coordinator. Next time you come home for the night and you start to put your keys away, think of this: It’s a security alarm system that you probably already have and requires no installation. Test it. It will go off from most everywhere inside your house and will keep honking until your battery runs down or until you reset it with the button on the key fob chain. It works if you park in your driveway or garage.

If your car alarm goes off when someone is trying to break into your house, odds are the burglar/rapist won’t stick around. After a few seconds, all the neighbors will be looking out their windows to see who is out there and sure enough the criminal won’t want that. And remember to carry your keys while walking to your car in a parking lot. The alarm can work the same way there. This is something that should really be shared with everyone. Maybe it could save a life or a sexual abuse crime.

I don’t care what your blog theme is, this can save someone’s life and needs to be spread

(via imstillcookiedough)

Yesterday was “fuck and gotdamn EVERYTHING.”  Today feels a bit better.  Chocolate pudding is part of the prescription.

revolutionary-afrolatino:

Fox 8 Cleveland angry with LKWD Music Fest after Communist musician calls for end to capitalism on live TV
FOX is tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight

FOX News: “Well, Boots, tell us a little bit about your band and the lineup people are going to hear today?” asked Fox 8 reporter Autumn Ziemba.
RILEY: Well, we’re a punk/funk/Communist revolution band.
FOX News: OK.
RILEY: And we are from Oakland, California, and we make everyone dance while we’re telling them about how we need to get rid of the system.
FOX News: Mmm.
RILEY: How exploitation is the primary contradiction in capitalism. And that if we want to express our power, we’re going to have to be more radical in our actions.

this is an all-Black band, from Oakland, and they’re called "The Coup." *buys CD*
Watch Fox News lose control
revolutionary-afrolatino:

Fox 8 Cleveland angry with LKWD Music Fest after Communist musician calls for end to capitalism on live TV
FOX is tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight

FOX News: “Well, Boots, tell us a little bit about your band and the lineup people are going to hear today?” asked Fox 8 reporter Autumn Ziemba.
RILEY: Well, we’re a punk/funk/Communist revolution band.
FOX News: OK.
RILEY: And we are from Oakland, California, and we make everyone dance while we’re telling them about how we need to get rid of the system.
FOX News: Mmm.
RILEY: How exploitation is the primary contradiction in capitalism. And that if we want to express our power, we’re going to have to be more radical in our actions.

this is an all-Black band, from Oakland, and they’re called "The Coup." *buys CD*
Watch Fox News lose control

revolutionary-afrolatino:

Fox 8 Cleveland angry with LKWD Music Fest after Communist musician calls for end to capitalism on live TV

FOX is tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight

FOX News: “Well, Boots, tell us a little bit about your band and the lineup people are going to hear today?” asked Fox 8 reporter Autumn Ziemba.

RILEY: Well, we’re a punk/funk/Communist revolution band.

FOX News: OK.

RILEY: And we are from Oakland, California, and we make everyone dance while we’re telling them about how we need to get rid of the system.

FOX News: Mmm.

RILEY: How exploitation is the primary contradiction in capitalism. And that if we want to express our power, we’re going to have to be more radical in our actions.

this is an all-Black band, from Oakland, and they’re called "The Coup." *buys CD*

Watch Fox News lose control

(via khromejio)

not-homophobic-but:

These tweets from @OfRedAndBlue are very important. not-homophobic-but:

These tweets from @OfRedAndBlue are very important. not-homophobic-but:

These tweets from @OfRedAndBlue are very important. not-homophobic-but:

These tweets from @OfRedAndBlue are very important. not-homophobic-but:

These tweets from @OfRedAndBlue are very important. not-homophobic-but:

These tweets from @OfRedAndBlue are very important.
“Black studies was never meant to be a means of merely learning about our past. It was a pedagogical innovation, not meant to be restricted to the study of blackness alone. It was to be a new approach to scholarship and teaching which would prepare black students to function in the hard times ahead for us while clearing the way for the ultimate humanization of a decadent American society. Black studies will be revolutionary or it will be useless if not detrimental.”
— N.H., A Torch to Burn Down a Decadent World, The Black Scholar, Issue 2 Volume 1 (1970)

(via blackfeminism)

blackfeminism:

intersectionalfeminism101:

It’s important to be able to spot when certain phrases are silencing tactics. The concept of compromise can be used to make minorities look irrational, as if their demands to be treated respectfully are complicated and difficult to agree to.
Such tactics that evoke the same type of doubt in a minority’s claims :
Gaslighting. Simple phrases such as “but I’ve never seen that happen,” or “that’s never happened to me” are meant to counter the oppressed’s credibility and make them seem unreliable.
Demanding sources for lived experiences. Sometimes it isn’t enough to the oppressors that a person testifies to living through horrible injustices. Facts are demanded to support the oppressed’s experiences, which are dismissed as “anecdotal evidence.” Which leads to the next point:
Framing human rights discussions as debates. No one should be able to debate whether or not someone deserves to live peacefully and happily. When oppressors try to engage in “debates” with the oppressed about their situations, the oppressor gets the upper hand, because suddenly the rules of debate apply, and emotions and anecdotal evidence are off limits. The oppressed are forced to discuss their own lives by the oppressor’s rules.
If you have experienced other silencing tactics when discussing racism, sexism, ableism, etc. please share to let others know what and who to be wary of.

i had a guy at a party tell me “you have to see things from both sides” when the other side was that women’s experiences do not exist, patriarchy isn’t real, it’s all imaginary…
blackfeminism:

intersectionalfeminism101:

It’s important to be able to spot when certain phrases are silencing tactics. The concept of compromise can be used to make minorities look irrational, as if their demands to be treated respectfully are complicated and difficult to agree to.
Such tactics that evoke the same type of doubt in a minority’s claims :
Gaslighting. Simple phrases such as “but I’ve never seen that happen,” or “that’s never happened to me” are meant to counter the oppressed’s credibility and make them seem unreliable.
Demanding sources for lived experiences. Sometimes it isn’t enough to the oppressors that a person testifies to living through horrible injustices. Facts are demanded to support the oppressed’s experiences, which are dismissed as “anecdotal evidence.” Which leads to the next point:
Framing human rights discussions as debates. No one should be able to debate whether or not someone deserves to live peacefully and happily. When oppressors try to engage in “debates” with the oppressed about their situations, the oppressor gets the upper hand, because suddenly the rules of debate apply, and emotions and anecdotal evidence are off limits. The oppressed are forced to discuss their own lives by the oppressor’s rules.
If you have experienced other silencing tactics when discussing racism, sexism, ableism, etc. please share to let others know what and who to be wary of.

i had a guy at a party tell me “you have to see things from both sides” when the other side was that women’s experiences do not exist, patriarchy isn’t real, it’s all imaginary…

blackfeminism:

intersectionalfeminism101:

It’s important to be able to spot when certain phrases are silencing tactics. The concept of compromise can be used to make minorities look irrational, as if their demands to be treated respectfully are complicated and difficult to agree to.

Such tactics that evoke the same type of doubt in a minority’s claims :

  • Gaslighting. Simple phrases such as “but I’ve never seen that happen,” or “that’s never happened to me” are meant to counter the oppressed’s credibility and make them seem unreliable.
  • Demanding sources for lived experiences. Sometimes it isn’t enough to the oppressors that a person testifies to living through horrible injustices. Facts are demanded to support the oppressed’s experiences, which are dismissed as “anecdotal evidence.” Which leads to the next point:
  • Framing human rights discussions as debates. No one should be able to debate whether or not someone deserves to live peacefully and happily. When oppressors try to engage in “debates” with the oppressed about their situations, the oppressor gets the upper hand, because suddenly the rules of debate apply, and emotions and anecdotal evidence are off limits. The oppressed are forced to discuss their own lives by the oppressor’s rules.

If you have experienced other silencing tactics when discussing racism, sexism, ableism, etc. please share to let others know what and who to be wary of.

i had a guy at a party tell me “you have to see things from both sides” when the other side was that women’s experiences do not exist, patriarchy isn’t real, it’s all imaginary…

(via femmelillies)