vintageblackglamour:

Cecil Williams in the 1950s - and today. I am taking the liberty of posting Mr. Williams again so people can see him now. From my original post: I thought about this searing, beautiful picture today in light of recent events in the United States. I, like many others, shared it a few years ago on my blog, but it was only today that I finally found the name of the man in the photograph! His name is Cecil Williams and, he happens to be a photographer himself. The photo was probably taken by Mr. Williams mentor, John Goodwin, who joined him for a talk at Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina in September 2013 about their experiences as black photographers in South Carolina during Jim Crow and the Civil Rights era. Mr. Williams, an Orangeburg, South Carolina native was a correspondent for Jet Magazine when he was only 15 and made national news after shooting some crucial pictures after the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre. This picture of Mr. Williams currently hangs over the water fountain on the Garden level of the Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina.

alloftheveganfood:

Vegan One Pot Pasta Round Up
One Pot Vegan Pasta
One Pot Wonder Thai Style Peanut Pasta
One Pot Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca with Chickpeas & Artichoke
Spinach & Artichoke Wonderpot
Outstanding One-Pot Pasta with Tomatoes & Herbs
10 Minute One Pot Tomato Pasta with Walnut Parmesan
One Pot Tomato Basil Spinach Pasta
alloftheveganfood:

Vegan One Pot Pasta Round Up
One Pot Vegan Pasta
One Pot Wonder Thai Style Peanut Pasta
One Pot Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca with Chickpeas & Artichoke
Spinach & Artichoke Wonderpot
Outstanding One-Pot Pasta with Tomatoes & Herbs
10 Minute One Pot Tomato Pasta with Walnut Parmesan
One Pot Tomato Basil Spinach Pasta
alloftheveganfood:

Vegan One Pot Pasta Round Up
One Pot Vegan Pasta
One Pot Wonder Thai Style Peanut Pasta
One Pot Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca with Chickpeas & Artichoke
Spinach & Artichoke Wonderpot
Outstanding One-Pot Pasta with Tomatoes & Herbs
10 Minute One Pot Tomato Pasta with Walnut Parmesan
One Pot Tomato Basil Spinach Pasta
alloftheveganfood:

Vegan One Pot Pasta Round Up
One Pot Vegan Pasta
One Pot Wonder Thai Style Peanut Pasta
One Pot Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca with Chickpeas & Artichoke
Spinach & Artichoke Wonderpot
Outstanding One-Pot Pasta with Tomatoes & Herbs
10 Minute One Pot Tomato Pasta with Walnut Parmesan
One Pot Tomato Basil Spinach Pasta
alloftheveganfood:

Vegan One Pot Pasta Round Up
One Pot Vegan Pasta
One Pot Wonder Thai Style Peanut Pasta
One Pot Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca with Chickpeas & Artichoke
Spinach & Artichoke Wonderpot
Outstanding One-Pot Pasta with Tomatoes & Herbs
10 Minute One Pot Tomato Pasta with Walnut Parmesan
One Pot Tomato Basil Spinach Pasta
alloftheveganfood:

Vegan One Pot Pasta Round Up
One Pot Vegan Pasta
One Pot Wonder Thai Style Peanut Pasta
One Pot Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca with Chickpeas & Artichoke
Spinach & Artichoke Wonderpot
Outstanding One-Pot Pasta with Tomatoes & Herbs
10 Minute One Pot Tomato Pasta with Walnut Parmesan
One Pot Tomato Basil Spinach Pasta
alloftheveganfood:

Vegan One Pot Pasta Round Up
One Pot Vegan Pasta
One Pot Wonder Thai Style Peanut Pasta
One Pot Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca with Chickpeas & Artichoke
Spinach & Artichoke Wonderpot
Outstanding One-Pot Pasta with Tomatoes & Herbs
10 Minute One Pot Tomato Pasta with Walnut Parmesan
One Pot Tomato Basil Spinach Pasta

blackpoemusic:

There
is a revolution
brewing
within
my hair
and that’s
no lye.

By Mawiyah Kai El-Jamah Bomani

(via daretobeblack)

fuckyeahfeminists:

dicy132:

mattysal22:

ttfkagb:

In the accompanying article Dwayne Johnson talks about his struggles with depression.

Everyone should read this article 👆

Reblogging to read in the morning.
This man is one of my idols!


love people who share their stories to combat stigma <3 fuckyeahfeminists:

dicy132:

mattysal22:

ttfkagb:

In the accompanying article Dwayne Johnson talks about his struggles with depression.

Everyone should read this article 👆

Reblogging to read in the morning.
This man is one of my idols!


love people who share their stories to combat stigma <3 fuckyeahfeminists:

dicy132:

mattysal22:

ttfkagb:

In the accompanying article Dwayne Johnson talks about his struggles with depression.

Everyone should read this article 👆

Reblogging to read in the morning.
This man is one of my idols!


love people who share their stories to combat stigma <3 fuckyeahfeminists:

dicy132:

mattysal22:

ttfkagb:

In the accompanying article Dwayne Johnson talks about his struggles with depression.

Everyone should read this article 👆

Reblogging to read in the morning.
This man is one of my idols!


love people who share their stories to combat stigma <3 fuckyeahfeminists:

dicy132:

mattysal22:

ttfkagb:

In the accompanying article Dwayne Johnson talks about his struggles with depression.

Everyone should read this article 👆

Reblogging to read in the morning.
This man is one of my idols!


love people who share their stories to combat stigma <3 fuckyeahfeminists:

dicy132:

mattysal22:

ttfkagb:

In the accompanying article Dwayne Johnson talks about his struggles with depression.

Everyone should read this article 👆

Reblogging to read in the morning.
This man is one of my idols!


love people who share their stories to combat stigma <3

fuckyeahfeminists:

dicy132:

mattysal22:

ttfkagb:

In the accompanying article Dwayne Johnson talks about his struggles with depression.

Everyone should read this article 👆

Reblogging to read in the morning.

This man is one of my idols!

love people who share their stories to combat stigma <3

coapostropheneill:

palacemagazine:

Ernest Shaw for Open Walls Baltimore. Malcolm X, Nina Simone, James Baldwin.

Oh this lovely black and queer wall mural

(via lepoisonedchocolates)

negrapresuntuosa:

true life: when naps get tired of your shit

negrapresuntuosa:

true life: when naps get tired of your shit

devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!
devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!
devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!
devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!
devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!
devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!
devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!
devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
S. Ross Browne
Series: Self-Evident Truths
from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.
I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.
The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.
The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?


This person is amazing!

devotedtodiversityinart:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

S. Ross Browne

Series: Self-Evident Truths

from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.

I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.

The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.

The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?

This person is amazing!

(via blackfeminismlives)

“It took Adolf Hitler and his Nazi cohorts 12 years to round up and murder 6 million Jews, but their Teutonic cousins, the British, managed to kill almost 4 million Indians in just over a year, with Prime Minister Winston Churchill cheering from the sidelines. Australian biochemist Dr Gideon Polya has called the Bengal Famine a “manmade holocaust” because Churchill’s policies were directly responsible for the disaster. Bengal had a bountiful harvest in 1942, but the British started diverting vast quantities of food grain from India to Britain, contributing to a massive food shortage in the areas comprising present-day West Bengal, Odisha, Bihar and Bangladesh. Author Madhusree Mukerjee tracked down some of the survivors and paints a chilling picture of the effects of hunger and deprivation. In Churchill’s Secret War, she writes: “Parents dumped their starving children into rivers and wells. Many took their lives by throwing themselves in front of trains. Starving people begged for the starchy water in which rice had been boiled. Children ate leaves and vines, yam stems and grass. People were too weak even to cremate their loved ones.””

Remembering India’s Forgotten Holocaust. 

Sarah Waheed notes: “One of the students in my modern South Asia history class a few years ago, was extremely upset that the book we were reading referred to the Bengal famine as a holocaust, calling the author ‘biased’. When I asked him to clarify and elaborate upon what he meant by ‘biased’, he exclaimed, inflamed, “There was only one holocaust!” The rest of the students were, however, more open to the idea of the 20th century being a century of multiple holocausts. The terms ‘holocaust’ and ‘genocide’, however, continue to elicit trauma envy.”

(via mehreenkasana)

(via guerrillamamamedicine)

epic-humor:

oh, nice legs.
the-best-of-funny:

x
the-best-of-funny:

x
the-best-of-funny:

x
the-best-of-funny:

x
“you cannot, you cannot use someone else’s fire. you can only use your own. and in order to do that, you must first be willing to believe that you have it.”
— audre lorde (via man—mohini)

(via azaadiart)

stunningpicture:

Tiger Mother Licking Her Cub. There are only 3,000 Tigers left remaining in the wild.